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Sparkle Weekly Wonderings

I love to talk about magic. I am happy to discuss magic with friends and strangers alike - and I have found over the years, that virtually everyone is open to that kind of conversation. When I say “Do you believe in magic” the answer is surprisingly ALWAYS yes - even from the most mathematical of materialists. The reason for this, I have found, is that everyone has their own definition of what magic is.

For some it is the tricks - the entertainment - the slight of hand and misdirection. Magic is the art of fooling people and making them believe they just performed the impossible. I love that kind of magic.

For others it is connected to the mystery of the natural world. It is synchronicity, remarkable coincidence and witnessing the impossible. I love that magic too.

For still others magic is deeply connected to love. It is the impossible to describe quality of love between a mother and child or between old comrades or between a boy and his dog. An all pervasive love that is so desperately strong it seems … again … impossible.

And so we have found a word that is at least relevant to understanding magic: impossible. I believe the word is important because - as humans - we are always suspect of the impossible. In fact we don’t believe in it. We prefer to say that we simply haven’t figured out yet how to make it possible. And so until we do … we’ll fill the question … with magic. Magic is what connects the impossible with the possible. And I love that kind of magic most of all.

This week we have several stories that ask you the question, “Do you believe in magic?” We’d like to know your answer. Email or comment on one of our “magic” posts. I can’t wait to hear what you say.

About the Author

David Sewell McCann
Story Spinner

David Sewell McCann fell in love with spinning stories in first grade – the day a storyteller came to his class and captured his mind and imagination. He has been engaged in storytelling all of his adult life through painting, film-making, teaching and performing. Out of his experience as a Waldorf elementary class teacher and parent, he has developed a four step method of intuitive storytelling, which he now shares through workshops and through this website.